Published by the Freedom From Religion Foundation, Inc. FFRF.org

Freethought books

Vol. 36 No. 03 April 2019
Jesus Christ, Not Again                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

The following books are by FFRF members on the

topics of religion or freethinking. FFRF does not do traditional book reviews.


A Freethinker’s Gospel

By Chris Highland

$16.95 (paperback)

Pisgah Press, 2018

A former Protestant minister and prison chaplain, Chris Highland is now a secular freethinker who muses on the natural world, on being a nonbeliever in a highly religious society, and the commonalities shared between religions. This compilation of essays offers his reflections on interfaith work, the search for self-discovery, and the commonalities that bind us regardless of social, political, economic, or religious backgrounds. His insights about the marvelous structure of our natural world and what nature can teach us, and the way our society is structured, addressing humanism, the natural world, and sensitive issues of faith, are enlightening and challenging.


Time Is Irreverent 2: Jesus Christ, Not Again!

By Marty Essen

$14.95 (paperback), $4.99 (Kindle)

Encante Press, 2019

Marty Mann and Nellie Dixon are back for another irreverent, liberal, twisty, time-travel comedy. The book is thought-provoking satire that answers the question, “What would happen if Jesus time traveled to 2020 America?” Would today’s evangelical Christians accept a profanity-loving brown-skinned Jesus, who preached in favor of liberal values? Find out in this hilarious sequel.


Feel the Spin

By Marshall Moskow

$7.99 (Kindle) 2017

A young science professor faces off against ignorance and bigotry in South Carolina 10 years after the end of the American Civil War. Thomas Walters has joined the faculty of Tideland College in the fall of 1875 as professor of the recently introduced disciplines of natural philosophy and astronomy. Walters finds himself caught up in the broader conflict between science and religion, as well as the bitter struggle between the ways of the Old South and the advance of a new national identity that embraces social equality, women’s rights, and rationality.